Use R to get gbif data into a GRASS database

Introduction

GBIF

The Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) is an international open data infrastructure that allows anyone, anywhere to access data about all types of life on Earth, shared across national boundaries via the Internet. GBIF provides a single point of access through http://www.gbif.org/ to species records shared freely by hundreds of institutions worldwide. The data accessible through GBIF relate to evidence about more than 1.6 million species, collected over three centuries of natural history exploration and including current observations from citizen scientists, researchers and automated monitoring programs.

There are various ways to import GBIF data, including directly from the website as comma delimited file (csv) and using the v.in.gbif addon for GRASS (I’ll post an example using this addon at a later stage). Here, however, I’ll use the rgbif package for R to obtain the data. In the link section some tutorials are listed that illustrate the use of other R packages. Continue reading “Use R to get gbif data into a GRASS database”

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Access R from GRASS GIS on Windows

Since I have switch from Windows to Linux, many years ago, things have started to look a lot brighter for those wanting to use GRASS on Windows. I won’t switch back to Windows any time soon, but I recently had to install WinGRASS for somebody else. And it was a whole lot easier than I had feared (or even hoped).

But there is one thing I couldn’t immediately figure out; how to run R from within GRASS. I should add that I installed GRASS using the OSGEO4W installer. When installing GRASS using the stand alone installer, access to R from the GRASS command line should work out-of-the-box (see comment from Helmut in the comment section below).

After a bit of trial and error, I came up with the steps below. It involves editing a file to tell GRASS where to look for executables. In the example below I am adding the path to the R and rstudio executables to this file. Having done that, I can now type R.exe or rstudio.exe on the GRASS command line to open these programs. Continue reading “Access R from GRASS GIS on Windows”