Use R to get gbif data into a GRASS database



The Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) is an international open data infrastructure that allows anyone, anywhere to access data about all types of life on Earth, shared across national boundaries via the Internet. GBIF provides a single point of access through to species records shared freely by hundreds of institutions worldwide. The data accessible through GBIF relate to evidence about more than 1.6 million species, collected over three centuries of natural history exploration and including current observations from citizen scientists, researchers and automated monitoring programs.

There are various ways to import GBIF data, including directly from the website as comma delimited file (csv) and using the addon for GRASS (I’ll post an example using this addon at a later stage). Here, however, I’ll use the rgbif package for R to obtain the data. In the link section some tutorials are listed that illustrate the use of other R packages. Continue reading “Use R to get gbif data into a GRASS database”

VIF stepwise variable selection


In modelling, multicollinearity in the set of predictor variables is a potential problem. One way to detect multicollinearity is the variance inflation factor analysis (VIF). In GRASS GIS, the VIF for a set of variables can be computed using the r.vif addon. This addon furthermore let’s you select a subset of variables using a stepwise variable selection procedure, in which variables are removed till the highest VIF values is less than a user-defined threshold value. In this post I introduce the addon and provide some examples how to use the addon. Continue reading “VIF stepwise variable selection”

Importing GLCF MODIS woody plant cover

The data set

The Global Land Cover Facility offers, amongst many other data sets, the MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields data set for download. These are layers that contain proportional estimates for vegetative cover types (woody vegetation, herbaceous vegetation, and bare ground). As such they are very suitable depict areas of heterogeneous land cover.

Their MODIS products differ from DAAC editions by coming in GeoTIFF format, geographic coordinates, WGS84 datum, and a tiling system designed to fit well with Landsat imagery. Currently the collection 5 is available, which contains proportional estimates for woody cover vegetation for the years 2000 to 2010. It can be downloaded as tiles (195 in total) via a ftp server.

Below I’ll provide an example Continue reading “Importing GLCF MODIS woody plant cover”

Importing data in GRASS GIS – an example


ISRIC, Earth Institute, Columbia University, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) have recently released a new data set of raster layers with various predicted soil properties. This data set is referred to as the “AfSoilGrids250m” data set. It supersedes the SoilGrids1km data set and comes at a resolution of 250 meter. The AfSoilGrids250m data (GeoTIFFs) are available for download under the Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license. See this page for download information.

In this post I’ll show you how you can import this data set in a GRASS GIS database. Continue reading “Importing data in GRASS GIS – an example”

Exporting your GRASS raster using r.out.gdal? Check the createopt options!

GRASS GIS can export your raster layer in most common (and quite a few less common) data formats using the r.out.gdal function (menu: file – export raster map – common raster formats). Exporting is so simple that you may forget that depending on the output format there are different options to optimise your output raster layer. Continue reading “Exporting your GRASS raster using r.out.gdal? Check the createopt options!”